About this program

Technology use in support of teaching is becoming increasingly prevalent at all levels of education. Learning Technologies, designed for teaching staff and e-learning teams, will explore the ways in which technology can transform teaching and learning, examine the features of a wide range of current digital learning tools and resources, and help staff determine how best to blend traditional and online teaching delivery, methods and resources to meet their learners’ needs.

Comprising over ten hours of media-rich, interactive material, Learning Technologies will help to keep staff up-to-date with recent developments to meet student demand for technology-enhanced learning in today’s competitive higher education environment.

Higher Education View

The great value of these courses is that lecturers who are interested in innovating with digital technologies can now build on advice and guidance collected together in an easily accessible way.

Professor Diana Laurillard

Professor of Learning with Digital Technologies, Institute of Education

For

Teaching staff who want to learn how to use learning technologies effectively in their teaching and e-learning teams who design online programs

Lead Advisor

Professor Diana Laurillard

Professor of Learning with Digital Technologies, Institute of Education

Free Trial:

Free one-week trial to any university wishing to review our courses and assess their suitability for students and staff.

Contact:

James R. Headley

  • (302) 660-1034

Learning Technologies Online

Course Module ID Core activities Additional activities Released Status
Introduction to learning technologies LTO 001 1.5 hours n/a Feb 2010

Overview

This course introduces the concept of technology enhanced learning and its impact on teaching. The course will help participants to:

  • Understand how technology-enhanced learning can transform teaching and learning
  • Learn about the variety of learning technologies available
  • Consider how teaching approaches might need to be modified for an online setting
  • Consider how technology-enhanced learning might operate in their own institution.

Syllabus

  • Module 1: Uses of technology in teaching: benefits, different technologies and their attributes
  • Module 2: New teaching and learning practices: traditional, blended and online teaching, synchronous/asynchronous communication, dynamics of online groups
  • Module 3: Technology-enhanced learning in context: your institution, your learners' context,; the future of technology enhanced learning

Contributors

Author

Professor Caroline Haythornthwaite

Director, School of Library, Archival and Information Studies, University of British Columbia (UBC)

Reviewer

Professor Ron Oliver

Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Teaching and Learning), Edith Cowan University

The effective use of VLEs LTO 002 1.5 hours n/a Feb 2010

Overview

This course will introduce the features and benefits of VLEs. Participants will learn about:

  • The features of VLEs and the advantages they offer to teachers and learners
  • Different learners’ needs in terms of content, accessibility and preparation
  • Integrating a VLE with a face-to-face course
  • Effective structuring of VLE course areas to make best use of the available tools.

Syllabus

  • Module 1: An introduction to VLEs: what is a VLE; why use a VLE
  • Module 2: Planning and preparation: learners’ needs; accessibility and preparation for learners; integrating the VLE with face-to-face teaching
  • Module 3: Building and running your course area: structure and navigation; communication, content, assessment and administration tools.

Contributors

Author

Sam Brenton

Deputy Director of Educational and Staff Development and Head of E-Learning; The Learning Institute, Queen Mary, University of London

Reviewer

Steve Ryan

Director of the Centre for Learning Technology, London School of Economics and Political Science

Internet based collaboration tools LTO 003 2.0 hours n/a Feb 2010

Overview

This course explores how IBCTs can be integrated into teaching. Participants will learn about:

  • The benefits IBCTs offer within distance, blended and on-campus teaching contexts
  • The different IBCTs which can be used to facilitate discussion, help learners create and share knowledge and build online communities to assist peer-to-peer learning
  • How best to implement particular IBCTs in their own institution.

Syllabus

  • Module 1: Introduction to internet-based collaboration tools (IBCTs) and their benefits
  • Module 2: IBCTs for discussion: text chat, internet-based telephony/video, web conferencing, discussion forums
  • Module 3: IBCTs for knowledge building: wikis, collaborative diagrams, shared documents
  • Module 4: IBCTs for community building: social networking, collaborative workspaces, microblogging
  • Module 5: Selecting and adopting IBCTs: institutional contexts and successful implementation

Contributors

Author

Dr David M. Kennedy

Director, Teaching and Learning Centre, Lingnan University, Hong Kong

Author

David Lefevre

Director, Educational Technology Unit, Imperial College Business School and Co-Founder and Chairman of Epigeum

Reviewer

Dr Terry Anderson

Professor and Canada Research Chair in Distance Education, Athabasca University

Course planning LTO 004 2.0 hours n/a Feb 2012

Overview

This course highlights the importance of fully embedding learning technology in course design. It will explore:

  • The key principles and benefits of learning design and the advantages of team design
  • The need to apply business sense to course design
  • Planning a course and technologies to facilitate learning design
  • How to blend traditional and online teaching methods and modes of delivery.

Syllabus

  • Module 1: Principles of learning design: benefits for teachers and learners, course design teams
  • Module 2: Know your audience: demand and supply, who are your learners, planning for diverse learners’ needs
  • Module 3: Scaffolding the design process: drawing up a plan, tools for learning design
  • Module 4: Finding your own blend: blended learning, static and dynamic content, aligning learning technologies with pedagogy, deciding on assessment

Contributors

Author and reviewer

Professor Mark Brown

Director, National Centre for Teaching and Learning and Distance Education and Learning Futures Alliance, Massey University

Author

Dr Richard Millwood

Director, Core Education UK and Reader, Institute of Educational Cybernetics, University of Bolton

Developing course content LTO 005 2.5 hours n/a Feb 2012

Overview

This course considers how to implement digital resources to support teaching and learning. The course will help participants to:

  • Learn how to select appropriate digital resources and map them to learning outcomes
  • Understand the ways in which digital learning resources support and enhance learning
  • Assess the pros, cons and practicalities of using existing resources versus creating new resources
  • Consider the quality of digital resources, storage and access and intellectual property restrictions.

Syllabus

  • Module 1: Types of digital learning resources, mapping resources to support learning needs
  • Module 2: Benefits of using digital resources
  • Module 3: Using existing content: benefits, locating content, VLE course cartridges
  • Module 4: Creating digital learning resources: advantages and drawbacks, digital tools, sharing resources
  • Module 5: Issues in using digital learning resources: quality assurance, storage and access, intellectual property rights

Contributors

Author

Dr Lawrence Ragan

Director of Faculty Development, World Campus, Penn State University

Author

Kevin Burden

Director, Post-Graduate Professional Development, University of Hull

Author

Simon Paul Atkinson

Associate Dean of Learning & Teaching (Teaching Enhancement), BPP University College of Professional Studies

Reviewer

Richard McCracken

Director, ecch

e-Assessment LTO 006 2.0 hours n/a Feb 2010

Overview

This course explores the use of e-assessment tasks to engage learners. It will help participants to:

  • Consider different types of assessment and their impact on learning
  • Compare e-assessment activities requiring selected, constructed or extended responses
  • Assess practicalities including the potential disadvantages of e-assessments
  • Explore new assessment opportunities offered by online discussion and collaborative work
  • Understand how e-assessment will affect participants’ own teaching, skills and institutional practices/facilities.

Syllabus

  • Module 1: Relationship between learning and assessment: why we assess learners, diagnostic and formative assessment
  • Module 2: Types of questions used for e-assessments: activities and tasks, interactive e-assessments, types of responses
  • Module 3: Practical issues: potential problems, marking and grading, security and accessibility
  • Module 4: Assessing communication, collaboration and group work, self and peer assessment, e-portfolios
  • Module 5: Future of assessment in higher education

Contributors

Author

Professor Geoffrey Crisp

Dean, Teaching and Learning, RMIT University

Author

Dr Phil Davies

Degree Project Organiser, Faculty of Advanced Technology, University of Glamorgan

Reviewer

Dr Cathy Gunn

Head of Elearning Group, Academic Advisor, Centre for Academic Development, University of Auckland

Teaching with learning technologies LTO 007 1.5 hours n/a Feb 2010

Overview

This course will look at how teachers can use technology to make their teaching more effective. The course will help participants to:

  • Identify a rationale for using learning technologies based on particular educational and learner needs
  • Prepare learning activities and use strategies to motivate, engage and support their online learners
  • Understand the multi-faceted role of the online tutor, including learning facilitator and social host.

Syllabus

  • Module 1: Experiences of teaching with technology: drivers and rationale for technology-enhanced learning, learner expectations, impact on your role
  • Module 2: Planning to teach with technology: tasks and activities, supporting learners, developing a structured and engaging learning process, preparation for collaborative work
  • Module 3: Tutoring with technology: the role of the online tutor, social needs of students, e-moderating, organization

Contributors

Author

Dr Rhona Sharpe

Head, Oxford Centre for Staff and Learning Development; Deputy Director of the Directorate of Human Resources, Oxford Brookes University

Reviewer

Professor Shirley Alexander

Deputy Vice-Chancellor and Vice-President (Teaching, Learning and Equity) and Professor, Learning Technologies, University of Technology, Sydney

Expert contributors include

  • Professor Diana Laurillard

    Lead advisor

    Professor of Learning with Digital Technologies, Institute of Education

  • Professor Mark Brown

    Author and reviewer

    Director, National Centre for Teaching and Learning and Distance Education and Learning Futures Alliance, Massey University

  • Dr Rhona Sharpe

    Author

    Head, Oxford Centre for Staff and Learning Development; Deputy Director of the Directorate of Human Resources, Oxford Brookes University

  • Professor Ray Schroeder

    US Editor

    Associate Vice-Chancellor for Online Learning; Director of Center for Online Learning, Research and Service; Professor Emeritus, University of Illinois at Springfield

Development group members

  • City University London, United Kingdom
  • Delft University of Technology, Netherlands
  • Durham University, United Kingdom
  • Edith Cowan University, Australia
  • Hogeschool Leiden, Netherlands
  • Institute of Education, University of London, United Kingdom
  • Leeds Metropolitan University, United Kingdom
  • Leiden University, Netherlands
  • Liverpool University, United Kingdom
  • Massey University, New Zealand
  • Newcastle University, United Kingdom
  • The Hague University, Netherlands
  • The University of Auckland, New Zealand
  • The University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom
  • The University of Sussex, United Kingdom
  • The University of Warwick, United Kingdom
  • The University of York, United Kingdom
  • University of London, United Kingdom
  • University of New England, Australia